The Unthinkable: Violence in Healthcare – From Bullying to an Active Shooter (COM)


The Unthinkable: Violence in Healthcare – From Bullying to an Active Shooter (COM)
Event on 2017-06-26 08:30:00
DESCRIPTION

Considering the news and staggering events of mass shootings in the last several months, workplace violence might be foremost in our minds. Most of us think of workplace violence occurring only in the workplace setting, but the threatening conduct is broader and may encompass behavior occurring outside the actual workplace. Even domestic violence creates challenges for all employers. The healthcare environment creates an even greater challenge to prevent and intervene in healthcare violence.

The rate of injuries and illness from violence in the healthcare industry is more than three times greater than violence in all private industry. Healthcare organizations include hospitals, outpatient clinics, medical office clinics, home health care, home-based hospice, paramedic and emergency medical services, mobile clinics, drug treatment programs and ancillary healthcare organizations. What makes violence in healthcare unique is that it carries negative ramifications for quality patient care.

In the U.S. some states, such as California, have passed legislation specifically addressing violence in healthcare. There are other federal and state laws that require the employer to address the hazards of workplace violence, and laws that protect the victims of workplace violence.

OSHA identifies healthcare as one of three “high risk” industries for violence. The violence is perpetrated not only by patients, their families, and visitors, but as well among the health professionals themselves. It may include a patient admitted to the ER high on drugs and wielding a knife. Or, it may be an enraged physician in the operating room flinging a scalpel at a nurse. And, the violence may be one nurse bullying another nurse – depending how the word “violence” is actually defined.

Violence in healthcare is not unique to the United States. In 2016, the 4th International Conference on Violence in Healthcare was held in Ireland. In the U.S. some states, such as California, have passed legislation specifically addressing violence in healthcare. In 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data reported healthcare and social assistance workers were the victims of approximately 11,370 assaults by persons; a greater than 13% increase over the number of such assaults reported in 2009. Almost 19% (i.e., 2,130) of these assaults occurred in nursing and residential care facilities alone. Unfortunately, many more incidents probably go unreported.

Learning Objectives:
To define workplace violence
To provide examples of workplace violence in healthcare
To discuss the relevant laws that address workplace violence
To state the impact and consequences of violence to the healthcare victims, the organization and patient care
To examine the clinical, occupational, social, and economic factors of violence in healthcare
To review 10 de-escalation tips when dealing with an angry individual
To examine the causes of healthcare violence
To discuss OSHA's guidelines for the prevention and intervention of violence in healthcare
To outline the roles and responsibilities of the organization's stakeholders
To explain how to help the workplace and workers recover following a violent episode.

Who will Benefit:
Healthcare administrators,
Nursing administrators and managers,
Risk managers,
Quality improvement professionals,
Clinic administrators,
Long term care administrators,
Home health care administrators,
Physicians,
Patient advocates

Day 01(8:30 AM – 4:30 PM)
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Registration Process – (8:30 am till 8:45 am)
8:45 am – 10:15 am: Workplace Violence in Healthcare
Definition of violence
Examples of violence in healthcare
Scope of the problem
High risk healthcare industries according to OSHA
10:15 – 10:30: Break
10:30 am – 11:45 am: Violence in healthcare: A worldwide problem
Risk factors, causes and contributing factors for violence in healthcare
Specific laws associated with violence in healthcare
Nurses at high risk for victimization – part of the job?
Examination of the clinical, occupational, social, and economic factors of violence in healthcare
11:45 am – 12:15 pm: Healthcare Culture as a catalyst for violence?
Joint Commission
OSHA
Real-life examples of violence in U.S. healthcare organizations
12:15 pm – 1:00 pm: Lunch
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm: The perpetrator of violence
Perpetrator patterns, profile, and traits
Identifying warning signs
Perpetrator triggers for violence
Domestic violence within the workplace setting
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm: Break
2:45 pm – 4:14 pm: Escalation and De-escalation of aggressive person
Signs of escalating anger
De-escalation techniques
When the perpetrator is a patient
4:15 pm – 4:30 om – Wrap up

Day 02(8:30 AM – 12:30 PM)
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8:30 am – 10:00 am The Unthinkable
Dealing with an active shooter
Guns at work
“Parking lot” laws
Recovery and workplace healing after an incident
Impact and consequences of violence to the healthcare victims, the organization and patient care
Public Relations
10:00 am – 10:15 am: Break
10:15 am – 12:15 pm Prevention & Intervention
OSHA’s violence in healthcare prevention mandates
Creating a violence prevention and intervention strategy
Roles and responsibilities of stakeholders
Mitigating risks
Evaluation of strategy
12:15 pm – 12:30 pm: Wrap up

Dr. Susan Strauss
Consultant, Strauss Consulting
Dr. Susan Strauss is a national and international speaker, trainer and consultant. Her specialty areas include management/leadership development, organization development, communication, and harassment and bullying. She is an expert witness for discrimination and harassment lawsuits. She trains and consults with business, education, healthcare, law, and government organizations from both the public and private sector

Dr. Strauss has authored over 30 book chapters, books, and articles in professional journals. She has been featured on 20/20, CBS Evening News, and other television and radio programs as well as interviewed for newspaper and journal articles.

She has a doctorate in organizational leadership, is a registered nurse with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and human services, a master’s degree in community health, and a professional certificate in training and development.

Please contact the event manager Marilyn below for the following:
– Discounts for registering 5 or more participants.
– If you company requires a price quotation.
Event Manager Contact: marilyn.b.turner(at)nyeventslist.com
You can also contact us if you require a visa invitation letter, after ticket purchase.
We can also provide a certificate of completion for this event if required.

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